Saturday, November 8, 2008

What is Quiet?



That's the question that came to me the other night as walked outside and noted how quiet everything was. It might have been the late hour - everyone was home from work and the sun was set. It might have been the rain - every sound seems to become dampened in the wet. Finally I knew what it was....there was no wind!

I had become so used to the blowing and rattling of leaves and branches that it was so different for things to be very still and calm.

As timing and luck would have it I am making a post with snow again - get used to it because it will become more common from now 'til spring. The snow we had before did disappear - really.


We are on the lucky side of things...no blizzard with 50 inches here. Just rain and now a small amount of snow.


There are some awards for plants that have stayed around longest through the frosts...raspberries (can't wait 'til next year when we get to harvest them).


Curly parsley has proven fairly hardy as well.


The swiss chard near the house has also survived.


Thanks for stopping by and let me know...how to you know when it is really quiet?

14 comments:

perennialgardener said...

What a peaceful time in your garden. I'm sure the snow muffles out the sound too. Don't you just love the way it makes your garden look?

tina said...

Interesting question. How to know quiet? I think for me it is when I start wishing for the birds to sing to take away the quiet.

Cheryl said...

Lovely post Chris.....I like to see the snow....we do see it but not very often.......
For me total silence is when fog descends upon the garden.....it almost seems like the beginning of time.......every sound is deadened, it is such a mystical and magical moment.......

ChrisND said...


Perennial Gardener, I have to love the look of snow ;-) Anytime the wind stops seems peaceful now - and warmer.

ChrisND said...

Hi Tina...that's true sometimes we need to hear sounds of life around us. For some reason I also like the little creatures like crickets and such.

ChrisND said...

Thanks Cheryl, Fog is a great example of how I felt the other night...with fog all the senses become smaller and we get to wonder about what is there...

Roses and Lilacs said...

It's never really quite at my place except at night. All day long the birds are chattering and dried corn is rattling in the fields. At night it is quiet inside broken only by the occasional cry of a night hunting raccoon or coyote.

ChrisND said...

Hi Roses and Lilacs....Sounds exciting to have so much going on. I think that's why I was surprised here - we usually have the noises of a town but everything was still for that night.

Rose said...

Lovely photos, but I am certainly not ready for snow! But you are right--there's nothing quite as still and peaceful as a winter evening with a blanket of snow to cover everything.
I shouldn't be surprised by your snow, though; whenever I watch the weather forecast here in Illinois during the winter, I am always thankful that at least we're not as cold nor have as much snow as North Dakota:)

Q said...

Dear Chris,
I live on the edge of the city. I know quiet when there are no cars, trains or planes zipping by. If we are having a severe snow storm I find quiet. Noise pollution is very real around my city as is light pollution.
Finding quiet is always my goal when I travel although I love the sounds of nature.
I am now thinking about noise and quiet and how I need some silence each day.
I never mind snow as long as it is in November-February. After February I am tired of it and ready for Spring again.
I heard about the huge blizzards. Glad you are safe and warm.
Sherry

ChrisND said...

Hi Rose...always someplace warmer and someplace colder ;-) All we need is a fireplace to complete the picture.

ChrisND said...

Sherry, even on a quiet winter night there is an orange glow from the city lights. Yes, I don't really mind natural sounds - but you do notice when the "white noises" stop.

Northern Shade said...

When the snow gets deep, the sounds of the city get muffled. It's one of the perks of a long winter. I especially notice it in the spring when everything melts, and the sounds are echoing again.

ChrisND said...

Hello Northern Shade. I guess you could call that a benefit of longer winters :-). It also seems to make the sidewalks and parkways much more private. I would say I notice the increase of sound in Spring - but I'm probably too excited spotting what plants are returning.